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Bridgewater Swimming Hole

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Brougham Street, Bridgewater VIC 3516
Follow the road right down to the Loddon River

Features

  • Historic swimming hole
  • Undercover barbecue area
  • Picnic tables
  • Information signs
  • Bench seat with a beautiful view over the water
  • Walking track
  • Basketball hoop
  • Toilets
  • Rubbish bins
  • Shallow water - do not dive
The scenic Bridgewater Swimming Hole has been a local favourite for generations, now featuring a beautiful picnic and barbecue area which overlooks the water, and easy riverside walking tracks complete with viewing platforms. 

The grassy picnic area features an undercover electric barbecue, picnic tables, bench seating, and a toilet block.

Diving is prohibited here due to shallow water.

Information signs at the swimming hole provide the following text:

Woomangeka Woorineen Willam Bik. Willam Dja Dja Wurrung Goonditch!

Welcome to our home land. Home of the Dja Dja Wurrung people. 

Bridgewater, as its name suggests, has always been a place of river crossing. The rocks you see here are remnants of an ancient basalt flow which originated at Bald Hill in the south, flowing across the Loddon River and creating a natural crossing point which has been used by generations of people. Basalt is also a vital tool used by the Dja Dja Wurrung people to grind seed collected from nearby grasslands.

The Dja Dja Wurrung and the North Central Catchment Management Authority work together to improve the health of Polodyal Yallock (Loddon River), the lifeblood of this country. 

The Bridgewater Weir

With the establishment downstream of the Flour Mill in 1873, and the building of the race to supply water to the waterwheel, a temporary wooden weir had been placed across the river at this point.

Prior to the building of the bridge across the Loddon in 1863, a punt operated about 100 meters below the weir allowing Cobb & Co's coaches to cross daily to the goldfields.

The current weir, headrace to the mill and the diversion channel for the supply of water to farmers, was constructed and opened in 1884. The weir allowed a more constant supply of water to the flourmill and also raised the water level to allow water to be diverted under the rock wall into the channel for about four weeks each year to fill farmers dams as far away as Serpentine.

The water dammed back in the river created a natural swimming pool in this very scenic section of the river.

A wooden pier was built, along with a  children's pool area and a 30ft diving tower on the island completed an ideal swimming area. A swimming club was formed in 1930 and for about 50 years an annual swimming carnival was held here.

The pool also satisfied the needs of the Inglewood community until their pool was completed in 1959.

The pool facilities were removed several years ago and the local Progress Association have plans to beautify this area in the near future. From the early 1950's to the present time water skiing has been a very popular pastime and sport up stream of the Loddon River Bridge. 

ACCOMMODATION NEARBY





DID YOU KNOW...

  • There are hundreds of fantastic barbecue areas throughout the Victorian Goldfields. Some are in parks/playgrounds, others are scattered throughout the bush. Many barbecue areas are located alongside amazing attractions and walks, so go out for a barbecue and get exploring!
  • There are heaps of fantastic swimming spots throughout the Victorian Goldfields, including the Loddon River, Cairn Curran Reservoir, Laanecoorie, Turpins Falls, and many more!
 

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